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Electric Cars save $$$

No pump, no pain. Jorge Silva/Reuters

https://www.citylab.com/transportation/2017/11/where-it-pays-to-drive-electric/546956/

A new study from the Union of Concerned Scientists found that EV drivers save almost $800 a year, depending on where, when, and how they charge.

Buying an electric vehicle has long been pitched as being about saving something—the planet, your lungs, your children’s future, etc. But a new report from the Union of Concerned Scientists emphasizes how EVs can drive consumer savings. They aren’t just more environmentally friendly than cars with internal combustion engines: They cost a lot less to drive.“Most people know how much gas costs—if you drive a car, you drive by gas stations, you see the costs—but a lot of people don’t think about how electricity is priced,” said David Reichmuth, the author of the report. Armed with data on the price of refueling EVs in the 50 largest U.S. cities, he found that EV users would save a median of almost $800 per year over a gas-powered car, depending on where, when, and how they charge their cars.

The savings aren’t evenly dispersed throughout the United States. In Houston, Texas, annual savings using the standard electric rate is $443; in Denver, $772; and in New York, $1,061. This is due to geographical variations in fuel prices (gas is much cheaper in Houston than in New York, thanks to Texas’ low gas taxes and close proximity to oil infrastructure) and electricity costs. Nationwide, however, electricity costs are much less volatile than gas prices: In 15 years, electricity has been priced between the equivalent of $.88 to $1.17 per gallon over 15 years, while gasoline has varied from $2.00 to $4.50 per gallon in the same time period.

Average Savings in Your City. (Union of Concerned Scientists)

Cities were compared based on the standard rate electricity providers bill for power, but customers who recharge in home garages are able to decide between a variety of rate plans from their electricity companies. To maximize savings, it matters which they choose.

Power company default settings are often flat-rate or tiered flat-rate plans, which keep the price of charging constant no matter the time of day. Other companies offer critical peak pricing (or CPP) plans, which charge surge prices on high-demand occasions. For EV owners, time-of-use (or TOU) plans that charge less for off-peak times like late nights are most cost effective, according to the report, since owners can plug in vehicles overnight, when the juice is going cheap. Off-peak TOU costs range from a low of $.25 per gallon in Minneapolis to $1.78 per gallon in parts of Los Angeles.It’s particularly important to be using the “right rate” in Californian cities, said Reichmuth. In San Francisco, for example, users on the TOU rate save almost $1,000 per year on fuel. For those using the standard rate of a given electricity provider, however, which is typically flat-rate or tiered flat-rate, the electricity costs exactly the same as gas: $3.34 per gallon.

For individuals, it’s easy to switch your billing plan. “Changing to time-of-use rates for a lot of people is just a matter of calling up the electric company, or going to the website of your provider,” said Reichmuth. Some states are drafting policy to mandate that switch. In 2015, California announced all public utility companies would change their default rates to TOU by 2019.

Right now, 80 percent of EV charging happens in-house. But public charging stations on highways and in parking garages are proliferating, especially in EV-friendly California cities, and using them changes the cost equation. Public chargers come in two flavors, slower 240-volt Level 2 chargers and quicker, more expensive DC Fast ones. Level 2 chargers are more ubiquitous, especially in states with high EV sales, while DC Fast Chargers are concentrated on the coasts and in urban areas.

Chargers can vary widely in pricing, depending on location and type. Some are free, some are priced based on length of use or energy used, and some charge a flat rate. Heavy users might invest in subscriptions in charging networks, that let you fill up at lower rates. Until last year, all cars manufactured by Tesla could top up their batteries for free at the company’s superchargers. The company halted the complementary service for cars manufactured after January 1, 2017, however—meaning that as their new Model 3s roll out this year, they won’t be eligible at all.
(Union of Concerned Scientists)

A case study of San Francisco showed that there, using the often necessary combination of home and public charging results in slightly lower cost savings. “If 20 percent of EV charging happens at Level 2 public chargers,” and the other 80 at home, “average fuel costs could increase from $0.78 per gallon equivalent to $1.05 per gallon,” reads the report. Time is money: Those costs go up further if using DC Fast chargers. Both methods are still cheaper than San Francisco’s average gasoline price in September 2017, however, which was $3.30 per gallon.

What about maintenance costs? EVs win again. Battery-powered cars don’t need regular oil changes, fresh fuel filters, new spark plugs, or other typical replacement items. Electric motors are comparatively maintenance-free, compared to internal combustion engines. Braking pads last longer in EVs, too, because they’re equipped with regenerative braking systems that lessen friction.

 On the other hand, EV drivers can burn through tires faster, since the rubber gets worked harder under the weight of battery packs. The UCS report doesn’t cover the most pricey potential repair item in EVs—their complex and costly battery packs, which lose capacity over time and use, especially in harsh conditions. Manufacturer warranties vary, but 100,000-mile coverage is the norm. “EV are still fairly new, but there is no evidence that battery replacement will be needed for most vehicles,” Reichmuth said in an email. “So we didn’t consider it (nor any issues that could crop up with a gasoline engine).”
Taking only scheduled maintenance into account, the report projects that an electric Chevy Bolt owner will spend over $1,500 less for the first 150,000 miles than for its gas-powered sibling, the Chevy Sonic.Of course, the higher-than-average purchase price of EVs has long been one of the main consumer turn-offs. But that gap is closing, and the cars themselves are getting cheaper—the base-level Bolt and Tesla Model 3 sell for around $27,000 after figuring in the (imperiled) federal tax credit. Both are about $35,000 before incentives. There are even cheaper models out there, pre-incentive: the $30,000 Nissan Leaf; the $27,000 Toyota Prius Prime Plus; and the $25,000 Chevy Spark.

Reichmuth himself drives a Bolt, which he calls “zippy around town” and “probably the quickest accelerating car” he’s ever owned. “Even if you ignore the cost and emissions savings”—which recent evidence proves you shouldn’t—“it’s still a great car from a driving perspective.”

Electric Semi Trucks

Elon Musk unveiled Tesla’s latest: the All-Electric Semi cargo truck.

https://www.tesla.com/semi/

“500 miles per charge – good for 80% of all truck delivery routes.

Fill up while your loading, then at your destination while you’re unloading.

Faster, Safer, Cleaner. Cheaper to Own, Operate & Maintain.”

Now Tesla needs to deliver. Or, as Thomas Edison said:

“A dream is something you could do;

a vision is something you must do.

But a vision without execution is just an hallucination”.

We’re looking forward to seeing the vision become reality.

Meanwhile – the race is on, as Daimler, Bosch, BYD, and others are working on trucks & buses that will leave diesel in fossil dust.

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-11-14/tesla-s-new-semi-already-has-some-rivals?utm_term=0_6ccfb2f247-c3b5a4cd16-58791645&mc_cid=c3b5a4cd16&mc_eid=4f40513742&utm_content=buffer629e1&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=buffer

$10,000 Discount on Nissan All-Electric Leaf

EarthKind Energy, in partnership with Sustainable Westchester, has secured a special offer for a $10,000 discount on the 2017 all-electric Nissan Leaf.

This program is available to all who live, work, or do business in Sustainable Westchester communities, including students or employees of Westchester colleges who live outside the county.

The Sustainable Westchester Board also voted to extend their Fleet Discount to ALL New York State college students and employees, and all employees of New York municipal governments.

Combined with state and Federal tax credits, the total discount comes to over $19,000.

$10,000 off MSRP* (Sustainable Westchester discount)
+$1,700 New York State rebate
+$7,500 Federal Tax Credit
= $19,200 Total discount on a NEW 2017 Nissan Leaf
How to participate:

1)  Go to www.sustainablewestchester.org.

2)  Click on “Electric Vehicles”

3)   Fill out the contact form

4.   Download the discount flyer

5)   Bring the discount flyer to one of the participating dealers.

It’s easiest if you live in Westchester, as you can just bring the flyer and your utility bill to Nissan New Rochelle.

College students & employees, and employees of NYS municipalities outside of Westchester must show their college or municipal ID to one of the 3 participating dealers (New Rochelle, Kingston, Rochester). Your Leaf can be delivered to your home or workplace.

***
The program ends when the remaining ~400 Leafs in New York State are sold

The 2017 Leaf gets 107 miles per charge, which is “only” good for 90% of most commuter & local travel.

The All Electric Vehicle saves you 50% to 70% on “fuel” compared to a gas vehicle. You plug it in at night, and every morning you have a full charge.

Or, for the first 2 years, use the manufacturer’s card for 2 years of free charging.

If you’re in ConEd utility territory, you can earn up to $400 per year by charging at night.

The all-electric Leaf lets you skip gas stations and periodic oil or transmission fluid changes. It comes with an 8 year, 100,000 mile battery warranty, and of course you will have the satisfaction of driving a clean, zero emissions vehicle.

If you have any questions, contact Ron Kamen @ 845-266-3723. Ron@EarthKindEnergy.com.

Or call Sustainable Westchester at (914) 242-4725.

More about electric vehicles:

How much money can you save with an Electric Vehicle? Click on this link:
https://www.nissanusa.com/leaf-electric-car/savings-calculator

To see how “The Future is Electric” – watch “The Fuel Station of the
Future”: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zLs7YOjC2mE

Volvo to go 100% EV by 2025

Volvo’s dramatically announced the end of its combustion engine era on July 5th, with a goal to sell 1M electric or hybrid cars globally by 2025.

While they are the only major automaker other than Tesla to make the 100% EV commitment – the trend is becoming clearer…

https://seekingalpha.com/news/3277029-volvo-draws-notice-ev-commitment?app=1&uprof=15#email_link

 

Westchester Power!

New York’s first Community Choice Aggregation (CCA) program Westchester Power, founded by Sustainable Westchester, reached its first year anniversary and was covered in this excellent article: https://westfaironline.com/90137/one-year-in-westchester-power-pushes-a-new-era-of-clean-energy/ EarthKind Energy is proud to be the Clean Transportation Project director for Sustainable Westchester, leading ground-breaking efforts to move toward emission free Electric Vehicles.

National Grid & SunRun Announce Partnership


As the solar industry matures, we are beginning to see the emergence of new partnership models. The latest announcement is between National Grid – who owns an electric distribution utility in Massachusetts & upstate New York – and SunRun, one of the leading funders of residential solar installations in the country. As the article notes: “The partnership will also include research on how distributed energy resources can be aggregated to balance and optimize the grid, a service which is currently provided by centralized generators.”  Read Here.

Happy 2017!

Through this Season’s Longest Night, We Remember that

Every Candle Illuminates the Deepest Darkness

And Each Day’s New Dawn Heralds the Return of the Light…

As Solar, Wind, Water, & Biomass Renewable Energy

continue to become the least cost sources of energy,

We wish You & All of Yours a Bright & Hopeful New Year –

Filled with Good Health, Peace, Joy, and Abundance.

USA Electric Grid Vulnerable For Attack

Wall Street Journal Grid attack

The Wall Street Journal has recently done a in depth study of our nations electric grid system. The bottom line is our electric grid is not safe. Not at all. Billions of dollars would need to be poured into the system to make it safe. Are micro grids an alternative to pouring more tax payer dollars into an already archaic system?  Read about the article here. There is also a video about the report you can access here on our Facebook page.

Clean Energy Means Clean Jobs

Renewable-Energy-You

One of the most important drivers of the economy is jobs.  And today with many jobs going overseas Americans need to create more and better jobs for today’s workers. In this week’s Poughkeepsie Journal   I had the opportunity to write a column regarding this very issue.  Clean energy is one of the answers to this lagging jobs market,  very simply clean energy creates clean energy jobs.  Clean Energy jobs are at a all time high growth rate,  outpacing many other sectors.

Coal Tax?????

coal-companies

This is certainly one of the dirtiest and generally nasty things talked about in the energy field today. The coal industry in the US is on it’s way out. This is a fact. And it is a fact that there are communities of people suffering because of that. A coal tax could be a answer to get the coal industry on the move. A move toward development of renewable energy and if instituted the socially responsible way could help this communities back on their feet. Read an article about this in USN.