Great editorial from the NY times – “The electric car has left the garage”!

 

There is simply no credible way to address climate change without changing the way we get from here to there, meaning cars, trucks, planes and any other gas-guzzling forms of transportation. That is why it is so heartening to see electric cars, considered curios for the rich or eccentric or both not that long ago, now entering the mainstream.

A slew of recent announcements by researchers, auto companies and world leaders offer real promise. First up, a forecast by Bloomberg New Energy Finance said that electric cars would become cheaper than conventional cars without government subsidies between 2025 and 2030. At the same time, auto companies like Tesla, General Motors and Volvo are planning a slate of new models that they say will be not only more affordable but also more practical than earlier versions. And officials in such countries as France, India and Norway have set aggressive targets for putting these vehicles to use and phasing out emission-spewing gasoline and diesel cars.

Skeptics may see these announcements as wishful thinking. After all, just 1.1 percent of all cars sold globally in 2016 were electrics or plug-in hybrids. And many popular models still cost much more than comparable fossil-fuel cars.

The skeptics, however, have consistently been overly pessimistic about this technology. Electric cars face challenges, yet they have caught on much faster than was thought likely just a few years ago. There were two million of them on the world’s roads last year, up 60 percent from 2015, according to the International Energy Agency. The cost of batteries, the single most expensive component of the cars, fell by more than half between 2012 and 2016, according to the Department of Energy. Tesla has indicated that it can produce batteries for about $125 per kilowatt-hour. Researchers say the cost of electric cars will be at parity with conventional vehicles when battery prices reach $100 per kilowatt-hour, which experts say is just a few years away. Electric cars are more efficient, of course, but they also require less maintenance, which should make them cheaper to own over time.

The potential environmental benefits of electric vehicles are huge. The transportation sector accounts for 14 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions and 27 percent of emissions in the United States. Moreover, countries have found it much more difficult to reduce planet-warming gases from transportation than from power plants. In America, for example, transportation emissions again regularly exceed those from the electricity sector for the first time since the late 1970s. The switch to electric cars is good for the climate because petroleum vehicles produce more greenhouse gas emissions per unit of energy than power plants fueled by natural gas, according to the Energy Information Administration.

Proponents say the growth of electric cars, when combined with the surge in renewable energy sources, like solar and wind, could lead to big reductions in emissions over time. These forces should also help reduce local air pollution in countries like China and India, which is why their leaders are getting behind these technologies in a big way. Government incentives have turned China into the biggest market for electric vehicles. And an Indian governmentminister says his country wants all cars sold there by 2030 to be electric. France says it wants to end sales of new diesel and gasoline cars by 2040, while Norway’s goal is 2025.

Government support could prove as crucial to the future of the technology as technical advances. If countries, states and localities encourage the spread of public charging stations, through tax breaks, other incentives or public spending, more people will take the plunge and convert. If the United States and other governments continue to spend money on research to help drive down battery costs, their economies and consumers will benefit.

Some parts of the fossil fuel industry will no doubt try to sabotage the electric car revolution. In the United States, the industry is lobbying statesto eliminate subsidies for the vehicles. And many analysts expect the industry to seek similar changes at the federal level from President Trump and Republican leaders in Congress, who have already made clear that they do not see climate change as a major threat. They should know, though, that the most they can do is slow down the process. The electric car has already left the garage.

$10,000 Discount on Nissan All-Electric Leaf

EarthKind Energy, in partnership with Sustainable Westchester, has secured a special offer for a $10,000 discount on the 2017 all-electric Nissan Leaf.

This program is available to all who live, work, or do business in Sustainable Westchester communities, including students or employees of Westchester colleges who live outside the county.

The Sustainable Westchester Board also voted to extend their Fleet Discount to ALL New York State college students and employees, and all employees of New York municipal governments.

Combined with state and Federal tax credits, the total discount comes to over $19,000.

$10,000 off MSRP* (Sustainable Westchester discount)
+$1,700 New York State rebate
+$7,500 Federal Tax Credit
= $19,200 Total discount on a NEW 2017 Nissan Leaf
How to participate:

1)  Go to www.sustainablewestchester.org.

2)  Click on “Electric Vehicles”

3)   Fill out the contact form

4.   Download the discount flyer

5)   Bring the discount flyer to one of the participating dealers.

It’s easiest if you live in Westchester, as you can just bring the flyer and your utility bill to Nissan New Rochelle.

College students & employees, and employees of NYS municipalities outside of Westchester must show their college or municipal ID to one of the 3 participating dealers (New Rochelle, Kingston, Rochester). Your Leaf can be delivered to your home or workplace.

***
The program ends when the remaining ~400 Leafs in New York State are sold

The 2017 Leaf gets 107 miles per charge, which is “only” good for 90% of most commuter & local travel.

The All Electric Vehicle saves you 50% to 70% on “fuel” compared to a gas vehicle. You plug it in at night, and every morning you have a full charge.

Or, for the first 2 years, use the manufacturer’s card for 2 years of free charging.

If you’re in ConEd utility territory, you can earn up to $400 per year by charging at night.

The all-electric Leaf lets you skip gas stations and periodic oil or transmission fluid changes. It comes with an 8 year, 100,000 mile battery warranty, and of course you will have the satisfaction of driving a clean, zero emissions vehicle.

If you have any questions, contact Ron Kamen @ 845-266-3723. Ron@EarthKindEnergy.com.

Or call Sustainable Westchester at (914) 242-4725.

More about electric vehicles:

How much money can you save with an Electric Vehicle? Click on this link:
https://www.nissanusa.com/leaf-electric-car/savings-calculator

To see how “The Future is Electric” – watch “The Fuel Station of the
Future”: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zLs7YOjC2mE

Volvo to go 100% EV by 2025

Volvo’s dramatically announced the end of its combustion engine era on July 5th, with a goal to sell 1M electric or hybrid cars globally by 2025.

While they are the only major automaker other than Tesla to make the 100% EV commitment – the trend is becoming clearer…

https://seekingalpha.com/news/3277029-volvo-draws-notice-ev-commitment?app=1&uprof=15#email_link